Harsh human rights law reforms will make it easier to deport migrants who break the law

Dominic Raab steps up the pressure on human rights law: reforms described as “spicy” will make it easier to deport migrants who break the law

  • Reforms will make it easier to deport failed asylum seekers and foreign criminals
  • Dominic Raab to reveal results of review of new measures “before Christmas”
  • Sources say use of ‘right to private and family life’ should be severely restricted










Ministers are due to present “slick” reforms to the human rights law next month to facilitate the deportation of failed asylum seekers and foreign criminals.

Justice Secretary Dominic Raab is expected to release the results of an independent review of the controversial legislation before Christmas.

The Human Rights at Work Act incorporates the rights set out in the European Convention on Human Rights into UK law.

He survived despite Brexit and has been blamed by ministers for his frustrating attempts to expel those who are not allowed to stay in this country.

Downing Street said the reforms would be designed to “ensure that human rights law meets the needs of the society it serves and inspires public confidence.”

Whitehall sources told the Daily Mail that the use of the controversial “right to private and family life” should be severely restricted.

Justice Secretary Dominic Raab (pictured) is expected to release the results of an independent review of the controversial legislation before Christmas.

A high-level source said the reforms would be at the “spicy, vindaloo end of the menu”.

The right to family life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights is routinely exercised by foreign criminals, including murderers and rapists, to avoid deportation from Britain after having committed crimes here.

It is also deployed by some asylum seekers who are trying to establish the right to stay in the UK.

Mr Raab is expected to announce his intention to also withdraw from the jurisdiction of the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, meaning that future human rights cases would be settled in London.

Speaking at the Conservative Party conference last month, he said the UK Supreme Court “should be supreme in human rights law”.

However, he should stop before withdrawing from the European Convention on Human Rights, despite some Conservative MPs warning yesterday that this is now essential.

Lee Anderson, a member of a group of MPs who spoke to Boris Johnson on the issue on Wednesday, said: “If we are to be a truly sovereign nation, we should establish our own legislation.”

Another present at the meeting said the prime minister asked lawmakers to “watch this space” when asked about reforming human rights laws.

The Nationality and Borders Bill will also limit the right of asylum seekers to make endless appeals.

When it comes into effect next year, people will have to present all of their claims at the same time, with no further right of appeal.

A source from the Home Office said: “We are going to stop the endless appeals that dragged on for years.

“You won’t be able to come back year after year with different claims for different reasons.”

How deadly crossings could be stopped

A group of more than 40 migrants board an inflatable boat as they leave the coasts of northern France to cross the English Channel this week

A group of more than 40 migrants board an inflatable boat as they leave the coasts of northern France to cross the English Channel this week

What are the potential solutions to the Channel migrant crisis?

1. British boots on the ground in France

The government has repeatedly offered border police and police officers joint patrols on French beaches. This would make it easier to monitor the 124 miles of coast from which the dinghies depart.

Probability?

French politicians insist the idea violates their sovereignty, but Boris Johnson urged them this week to accept the idea.

2. France agrees to take back the migrants

Conservative backbenchers say the best way to destroy the business model of smuggling gangs would be to show that all successful migrants end up in France quickly. Requires a new post-Brexit return agreement with the French.

Probability?

France has so far shown no signs of wanting to conclude a new return agreement with the UK.

3. Asylum applications being processed abroad

Another policy popular with Tory MPs, who believe Australia has reduced the number of asylum seekers with a firm stance of detaining migrants on a remote island while their claims are considered. But that would prove to be costly and open to legal challenges.

Probability?

All that remains is for the ministers to persuade an overseas government to accept the plan. So far they have looked everywhere from Ascension Island to Isle of Man and Albania.

4. Vessels turned back at sea

The “pushback” tactic was announced by Priti Patel in September. Border force officers were trained in the exercise, which would see them circling a rubber dinghy on jet skis, blocking its path and then returning it to France. It has not yet been used.

Probability?

The risks of fragile and overcrowded inflatables returning to the busy Channel may mean captains of border forces will never consider it safe to try.

5. Make it more difficult to apply for asylum in Great Britain

Under the flagship Nationality and Borders bill, a two-lane asylum system will see those arriving across the Channel considered illegal with fewer rights than those coming via legal routes and safe.

Probability?

The new law is expected to pass given the government’s majority in the Commons, but once it takes effect, attempts to curtail asylum seekers’ rights will be challenged in court by human rights lawyers. .

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